The Love Hormone & Sports: How to Be Better in Bed & on the Field

The Love Hormone & Sports: How to Be Better in Bed & on the Field

Written by Michael Roizen, MD
on Thursday, 20 December 2012
Dwyane Wade, Joe Johnson, and Mike Bibby. What do these NBA stars all have in common, besides the fact that they are all guards?

You guessed it - according to their Nike advertisements, it's their love for the game of basketball - they love it irrationally and unconditionally - meaning independently of other benefits.

As an enthusiastic spectator of many sports and player of one or two (I captained the US squash team in its inaugaural foray into the Pan American games), I enjoy seeing the dedication of athletes and am always amazed by the sweat and tears left on the court and in the stands afterwards. So, why do fans get so wrapped up in the team's performance?

We talked about the science of this on the YOU The Owner's Manual Radio Show during the 11-24-2012 program...but here's the summary: What fuels an athlete to give 110% effort is more than making bank, or being famous. The fame and cash flow aren't too shabby for many of the professionals, but we all know that money can't always buy happiness.

Whether athletes are playing under the spotlight or at the neighborhood courts, sports competitions trigger the release of something much deeper to humans - oxytocin, the love or cuddle hormone that's released by couples in love and by mom's in tremendous amounts during early bonding with their newborns.
A Message from AAP President in Response to Connecticut School Shooting

A Message from AAP President in Response to Connecticut School Shooting

Written by Melanie Cole, MS
on Saturday, 15 December 2012
Hello All, The news from Connecticut has hit us all really hard. This is a message from the AAP President that we hope will assist you in dealing with this tragedy.

A Message from AAP President Thomas McInerny, MD, FAAP, in Response to Connecticut School Shooting

Today is a day of sadness and grief for everyone who cares for children. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers its deepest sympathies to everyone affected by today's tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. Pediatricians and other child health experts strongly recommend that schools and parents avail themselves of resources to help them talk with children about this disaster. As in any frightening situation, young children should not be exposed to the extensive media coverage of the event -- in other words, turn off the TV, computer, and other media devices. The AAP offers resources for talking to children about disasters, and advice on watching for signs of stress and trauma. Parents also can use their child's pediatrician as a source of advice and support during this time.
The Superwoman Syndrome: Learning To Accept Help

The Superwoman Syndrome: Learning To Accept Help

Written by Melanie Cole, MS
on Thursday, 22 November 2012
Hello again. When last we met, I was speaking about losing weight, and getting fit. If you are a busy mom, and if you have to work a job, or 2 as I do, as well as take the kids to various activities and (try to) keep a clean house, it can become overwhelming.

So I would like to offer some bits of information on making it all come together with out driving yourself nuts.

First thing is..ENLIST THE HELP OF YOUR SPOUSE.

Too many women think they are an island. We cannot, I repeat cannot, do it all alone. If you are a single mother - especially - you have to enlist the help of others. I know many of you are saying to me, "but they don't do it right, or the way I would do it".

Well yes, that is true. However, one thing I have learned is...

wait...still trying to learn.... haha...

....is you can not control the way other people do things for you. Yes we certainly try, and its frustrating that other people can't do things as well as we can. But we must learn to settle down and take the help that is given.
You CAN Avoid Weight-Gain During The “Holidaze”

You CAN Avoid Weight-Gain During The “Holidaze”

Written by Dr. Decker Weiss, NMD, FASA
on Monday, 26 November 2012
As a cardiologist who specialized in prevention and the natural reversal of heart disease, I used to dread 1/12th of the year, December. Most outsiders to the profession do not know this, but for most cardiologists December is our busiest month.

There are a couple of reasons why, but the first issue is depression.

We know that depression or feeling "holiday blue" increases the risk of ACS (Acute Coronary Syndrome) or heart attack.

The second reason, and the most modifiable, is holiday habits including nutrition. Holiday and nutrition, why do these words have to "cancel each other out"? When we hear the words "holiday and nutrition", we think immediately of sugar, overeating, and gaining weight.

So about ten years ago I put together a "holiday plan" for my non-diabetic, non-acute, (no immediate crisis) patients. Over ten years the patients who followed this did not gain weight, enjoyed food and fun, and had far more enjoyable holiday season then the ones that did not.
5 Normals: Why The Cleveland Clinic Pays It’s Employees to Get ‘Em And Why ObamaCare Should Consider Doing So

5 Normals: Why The Cleveland Clinic Pays It’s Employees to Get ‘Em And Why ObamaCare Should Consider Doing So

Written by Michael Roizen, MD
on Friday, 23 November 2012
I often say on the show: YOU get a Do-Over and YOU can achieve 5 normals. And if you did you'd live 30% longer and with 30% less disability than the usual North American. And if 70% of us did it, we could pay you a 2000 rebate each year and we'd not have a budget deficit or a problem competing for jobs.

Let me tell you the background, our healthcare costs are twice developed Europe's and four times those of Mexico, China, India and Japan only because we have twice the chronic disease of Europe and four times that of MCIJ. Your choices, not your genes cause that. Almost our entire deficit (actually it is our entire deficit but that seems outrageous, but is actual) is caused by our lifestyle choices and their effect on Medicare, Caid, Federal and State direct healthcare costs (for employees, retirees etc).
Arsenic in Rice

Arsenic in Rice

Written by Michael Roizen, MD
on Thursday, 25 October 2012
Dr. Oz broke the story that arsenic was contaminating our apple juice. And despite heavy criticism at the time from many in the news media and even from the FDA official spokeperson, Dr. Oz’s medical unit data was proven correct, and the juice companies are reforming.

Now another food that is contaminated with arsenic.

On average, a typical North American Adult (USA and Canada data) consumes 25 pounds of rice per year—that’s a lot of rice! Rice is a staple grain in the American diet that is typically touted for being healthy. Recently, however, rice has been under the microscope for possibly being toxic. Shocking headlines released in recent news highlighted new data on arsenic levels in rice, causing all of us to question—is the grain safe to eat?

Reports on the matter provided conflicting messages. Some suggested consumers temporarily stop eating rice while others recommended limiting daily portions. Which is best for YOUR health? This blog should help you answer these questions for you and your family.
Your Healthier Life & RadioMD

Your Healthier Life & RadioMD

Written by Melanie Cole, MS
on Saturday, 22 September 2012
Hi there!

My name is Melanie Cole and I am an Exercise Physiologist, personal trainer, wife, and mother of 2 wonderful kids. I've been in the health field for 25 years, and I'm delighted to host a number of shows here on your RadioMD. We do a wonderful show for the American Academy of Pediatrics called Healthy Children. And parents? Listen up. Each week, I interview some of the world's very best pediatricians.

It's such a great opportunity for all of us parents to get free advice on everything from sore throats and ear infections, to childhood milestones and behavior issues, and everything in between. I 'm constantly learning from these world-class doctors, and I hope you'll join me as we explore new and practical ways to encourage our kids to be healthier and happier.
Welcome to RadioMD

Welcome to RadioMD

Written by Elle Sanders
on Thursday, 13 September 2012

Welcome to RadioMD! We're so glad you're here.

My name is Elle, and I'm the Communications Director here at RadioMD. Mostly what that means, is I have the completely excellent job of listening to you. I love it! It's the best part of my day, and whether it's here, on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, in the comments on the different health segments and recipes, or via email - my job is to make sure we're getting you the information and expert advice you need.

RadioMD is not only a new website, it's also a whole new health portal....one that's dedicated to helping you live a healthier, more satisfied, and all around happier life. We have a great team of health experts and technical professionals who are working hard every day to bring you the latest, most up-to-date healthy living information.

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