Frustrations of a Celiac

Frustrations of a Celiac

Written by Lauren Allen
on Monday, 04 November 2013

Why is it that more places are offering gluten-free foods, but are recommending that people with Celiac Disease shouldn't eat there?

Doesn't that defeat the purpose?

It's been two years since my diagnoses of Celiac Disease. At first, I would overdramatize how much my life was ruined and that food would no longer mean the same. I recently became excited to hear of all the great options that were open to me. Little did I know, what restaurants really meant was their gluten free option is only for those who are going through yet another diet fad, not those who truly need it.

I've always had digestive problems, but thought it was just stress, or IBS. It seemed normal to me (and I as I type this I realize how this sounds) to throw up, have diarrhea, and get horrible abdominal pains, and constantly feel bloated immediately after eating.

I had just transferred to DePaul University in the fall of 2011, and was just getting used to living back on a college campus again. This was when I began noticing more and more issues with my gut. However, I ignored these symptoms and just thought I was stressed from school, as I tend to be during the quick ten-week quarter system DePaul has.

A few nights a week I would be up all night, death gripping the sides of my toilet while everything poured out of my mouth. My roommates would joke with me and say, "You're sick all the time. Maybe you have the gluten thing." Laughing, thinking that was not even possible, I ignored them and continued doing absolutely nothing about addressing the problem.

As time progressed, it started to become a hassle to eat. After every meal I would feel exhausted from throwing up, from the horrible pains I felt and all I wanted to do was lay down. Date nights I had with my boyfriend turned embarrassing, for I would need to quickly excuse myself to spend what seemed an eternity in the ladies room.
Estrogen Dominance: Too Much of a Good Thing Can Be BAD

Estrogen Dominance: Too Much of a Good Thing Can Be BAD

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Friday, 01 November 2013
When there is an excess of any hormone in relation to the whole intricate system we call the"endocrine system", an overall imbalance develops, and health problems can arise. When there is too much estrogen and not enough progesterone to counteract its effects, the situation is called estrogen dominance.

Estrogen dominance is a multi-factorial situation and is caused by such things as exposure to excess environmental xenoestrogens, use of synthetic estrogens such as the birth control pill and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), anovulation (lack of ovulation during menstrual cycle, which is not uncommon among women older than 35), digestion issues (which tax the estrogen-detoxification process in the liver), unrelenting stress (which strains the adrenals and the thyroid), unresolved emotional issues, poor diet and negative lifestyle factors such as smoking and alcohol use.

How does estrogen dominance specifically alter women's health?
No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service: 4 Tips for Unplugging

No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service: 4 Tips for Unplugging

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Friday, 11 October 2013
Do you remember the old sign: NO SHIRT, NO SHOES, NO SERVICE? It was hung on gas stations, grocery stores and restaurants to convey a threat that you would not have access to that establishment's service if you hadn't shoes on, nor a shirt.

What I wouldn't give to have that sign hanging almost everywhere these days!

Well, ok...the shirt thing is questionable.

But having no shoes on, feeling the great earth and warm grass underneath my feet and having no service by not having access to the electronic blizzard and bings and dings and rings of our modern day?!

I would heed to that sign each time I saw it! 

Without me going on a vandalizing spree and hanging new signs everywhere, I have come up with some helpful tips to help me unplug from and enjoy having "no service".
Warning: Another Deadly Chemical in Our Food Supply

Warning: Another Deadly Chemical in Our Food Supply

Written by Michael A. Smith, MD
on Monday, 07 October 2013
Brominated vegetable oil (BVO) is vegetable oil with bromine added to it. Brominated vegetable oil is used as an emulsifier in citrus-flavored soft drinks to help the flavors stay suspended in the drink and to produce a cloudy appearance.

Just look at Mountain Dew, for example. The hazy appearance within its very unnatural fluorescent color comes from BVO.

Patented by chemical companies as a flame retardant, and banned in food throughout Europe and Japan, BVO has been added to soft drinks for decades in North America. Now, some scientists have a renewed interest in this little-known ingredient.
How to Treat Constipation Safely

How to Treat Constipation Safely

Written by Michael A. Smith, MD
on Thursday, 19 September 2013

Occasional constipation is usually not a big deal. For most of us, with better hydration, it resolves itself without much of a hassle.

However, chronic bouts of constipation are not only uncomfortable, but also can inflame your colon's mucosal lining. This inflammation can cause bowel motility problems in the future.

The problem with chronic constipation is that no one really knows how to define it or treat it. The conventional approach usually involves bowel stimulants which can be unpredictable and ineffective.

Not only that, but who wants to have to rely on bowel stimulants for long periods of time? They're just not a good option for effective relief.
5 Healthy Reasons to Take a Cruise

5 Healthy Reasons to Take a Cruise

Written by Sylvia Anderson
on Wednesday, 18 September 2013

Cruises have been getting some negative press in the past year or two, with all the fires breaking out aboard, engine trouble, and let's not forget the fate of the Costa Concordia in Europe. But cruise enthusiasts like to think those occurrences are the exception to the rule (and being an enthusiast myself, I agree).

In fact, a cruise is a great venue for a get-away... not only from a vacation perspective, but also from a health perspective.

In the past, cruises have gotten a bad health rap for encouraging over-indulgence. I've been on plenty of cruises myself, and I can tell you that the five-course meals and midnight buffets can be a diet buster. But things are a'changing. These days, taking a cruise can be a truly healthy experience - for body and mind.
Bitter Truth About Sugar: It Makes Cancer Grow

Bitter Truth About Sugar: It Makes Cancer Grow

Written by Michael Roizen, MD
on Tuesday, 10 September 2013

Sugar - sweet to your taste buds but perhaps toxic to your body and your proteins. Just because your taste buds approve, does not mean that the rest of your body will too. Sugar is like your awful ex who was charming at the beginning of the relationship but made your life miserable by the end. Sugar works in the same way - it can easily win your taste buds over, leaving the rest of your body to suffer with the consequences.

Previous studies have shown that a high sugar diet increases the risk of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance, but the damage does not stop there. In fact, sugar does much worse things to your proteins. Two separate studies published in August 2013 suggest that sugar is also associated with an increased risk of cancer, mortality, and lower sexual health.
Distance Makes the Heart Grow Fonder... and Healthier

Distance Makes the Heart Grow Fonder... and Healthier

Written by Sylvia Anderson
on Sunday, 08 September 2013

If I had a quarter for every weird look I get when I tell people my husband and I live 2500 miles apart (by choice), I could buy myself a very nice handbag.

The usual responses are, “That must be SO hard!” or “How does that work?” Or, my favorite, “That’s interesting...” with a confused look.

It’s true. Our marriage is unconventional, to say the least. Joe and I have been married for 16 years and have known each other for over 20. We’ve been living apart for seven years. And yes, by choice.

Very few people truly understand the decision to live this way. But it’s a relevant topic... whether you live apart from your significant other by choice or by circumstance, it’s happening more and more in the world we live in. Military duties take spouses away for months – even years at a time. College or continuing education opportunities force couples to live apart. Careers often take precedence over living in the same household.

People generally understand (and accept) those “separated by circumstance” occurrences more than one by choice. Why would one consciously choose to live apart from the one they love?

Here’s my answer: two happy individuals make up a happy marriage, despite the distance.
Is Processed Fructose a Poison?

Is Processed Fructose a Poison?

Written by Michael A. Smith, MD
on Monday, 02 September 2013

What is a poison? Well, interestingly, there are different theories as to what makes something a poison. But most of them go something like this:

"A dangerous chemical, natural or unnatural, enters the blood through the skin, gut or lungs and travels to the liver, the primary organ of detoxification."

The liver attempts to "detoxify" the chemical creating metabolites — sometimes the metabolites are less toxic and sometimes they're not — in order to excrete the chemical and any remnants of it out of the body.

So for us to believe that fructose is a poison, it needs to follow, in some respects, the pathway I just described — and I'll get to that soon.

But first, let's clarify something...
Mindful Eating for Weight Loss & Pleasure

Mindful Eating for Weight Loss & Pleasure

Written by Melanie Cole, MS
on Tuesday, 27 August 2013

Have you ever noticed that you eat while you watch TV, drive, work, talk on the telephone? That sometimes you just eat, mindlessly? Just shoveling food in with no real thought about whether it tastes good, feels good, IS good?

Are you one of the many of us? The people who eat too fast, too thoughtlessly, too unhealthily?  Are you so busy filling the next forkful that you don't even notice the wonderful bite of food already in your mouth?

YIKES! Right?

Since your brain can only really focus on one thing at a time, when you eat while doing something else you far too often miss the subtle signs of fullness that tell you to STOP! At least not until you feel uncomfortable or until you run out of food.

Friends Don't Let Friends Get Fat?

Friends Don't Let Friends Get Fat?

Written by Lauren Allen
on Tuesday, 27 August 2013

It happens to the best of us. You maintain a strict habit of exercise and dieting throughout the week. You're disciplined. You're organized. You've got this. Then the weekend approaches and it’s time for date night, or the much-needed opportunity to catch up and hang out with your friends. You, believing you are being a good healthy-eating planner, check out the restaurant's menu online beforehand to pick out a reasonably healthy meal and drill this motivational speech into your head:

"I will not overindulge tonight." 

And this time, you're serious.

That is, until you hear what your friends are ordering. And before you know it you’re ordering a side of French fries AND a slice of cake to go.

What just happened?
Read The Label: The Gluten-Free Reality

Read The Label: The Gluten-Free Reality

Written by Michael Roizen, MD
on Saturday, 17 August 2013

Seeing the words "gluten-free" stamped onto a box of cookies, crackers, or Twinkies is not a green light that sends you on the road to healthier living. Now that the availability of gluten-free junk foods is legitimized by appearance in "common" large grocery chains, and product offerings expanded faster than waistlines, misinformation about these allergy-friendly foods is increasing.

Oh yes, large packaged food companies are listening to the siren scream of customers for more gluten-free foods choices. But like much in the past history of food companies' service of public wants, it's demand begetting inferior (from a healthful perspective) supply. As more shoppers load their grocery carts with gluten-free pretzels and pasta, grocery suppliers and stores expand their gluten-free aisles. According to a survey conducted by the NPD group in January 2013, approximately 30% of adults in the United States reported trying to reduce or exclude gluten from their food intake.

Despite the fact that a gluten-free diet is beneficial only to folks allergic or intolerant to gluten, many perceive gluten-free foods to be healthier and associated with weight loss. The real truth: gluten-free does not equal sugar free, healthful, skinny, or low fat. In fact, gluten-free foods often are less healthy and more expensive than their healthier, less sugared, whole wheat counterparts. You need to do what is best for your health and your budget—so here's the gluten-free 411.
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