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The Latest in Alzheimer’s Research

Jacob Teitelbaum, MD
Guest Bio
Guest Bio: Jacob Teitelbaum, MD
Jacob Teitelbaum head shotJacob Teitelbaum, MD, is Director of the Fatigue & Fibromyalgia Practitioners Network and author of the best-selling book, From Fatigued to Fantastic! He is also the creator of the popular free iPhone & Android application "Cures A-Z."

He is the lead author of four studies on effective treatment for fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, and a study on effective treatment of autism using NAET.

Dr. Teitelbaum does frequent media appearances including Good Morning America, CNN, Fox News Channel, the Dr. Oz Show and Oprah & Friends. He lives in Kona, Hawaii.
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain disorder that damages and eventually destroys brain cells. This leads to memory loss, changes in brain function and thinking. According to the Alzheimer's Association, more than five million Americans are living with this disease and it is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

Over 85% of all Alzheimer's cases occur in the United States, Western Europe and developed Asian countries. This has led many experts to research the impact pollution, toxins and cellular health has on developing Alzheimer's disease.

What are some of the biochemistry research developed for Alzheimer's?

Research emerges frequently about new developments in the treatments and links to Alzheimer's. In fact, researchers are now looking into cognitive impairment and energy levels.

Another development in Alzheimer's is that attacks on the mitochondrial protein by a free radical, nitric oxide, which causes a chemical reaction called S-nitosylation.

What about genetic research?

The newest findings claim that blood tests can predict if you will have Alzheimer's. Researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center and the University of Rochester School of Medicine reported that a panel of 10 lipids could one day predict Alzheimer's.

Is there any way to lower your risk?

Exercise has been emphasized to help lower your risk. This includes both physical and mental exercise, such as doing a crossword puzzle or striding on the elliptical.

Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, MD, joins Dr. Mike to discuss the latest research on Alzheimer's, as well as promising new treatments.

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