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Butter Gets a Pat on the Back

From the Show: HER
Summary: Put an end to butter shaming. It's time to start enjoying this churned goodness.
Air Date: 5/15/17
Duration: 27:15
Host: Michelle King Robson and Pam Peeke, MD
Guest Bio: Elaine Khosrova, Author
Elaine KhosrovaElaine Khosrova is an independent writer who specializes in stories about food history and gastronomic culture.

A former pastry chef and fellowship student at the Culinary Institute of America, Elaine holds a BS in food and nutrition. She began her career in food publishing as a test kitchen editor at Country Living magazine, followed by staff positions at Healthy Living, Classic American Home, and Santé Magazine.

In 2007, she received a Gold Folio journalism award, and in 2008 she became the founding editor of Culture, a national consumer magazine about specialty cheese that continues to serve cheese enthusiasts. She's contributed to numerous national food and lifestyle publications, as well as the forthcoming Oxford Companion to Cheese.

After many excursions into the world of dairy for the sake of cheese lit, Elaine left Culture magazine in 2013 to begin research on her book about butter -- the first and only publication (thus far) to chronicle the life and times of this beloved fat. Her butter chase took Elaine throughout the United States and to France, Ireland, India, Bhutan, and Canada. She's never been the same.

An avid cook, baker, traveler, camper, cyclist, and musician, Elaine lives with her family in New York's Hudson Valley.
Butter Gets a Pat on the Back
Butter has gotten a bad rap over the past 15-plus years. It’s time to set the record straight so you can enjoy butter without guilt.

For a buttery experience like our ancestors enjoyed, seek out butter from grass-fed cows. You can also try butter from sheep and yaks.

Butter is filled with goodness. One-third of the fat in butter is the same as the saturated fat you find in olive oil. Butter contains vitamin K and conjugated lineolic acid (CLA). It also has many micronutrients.

A little dab of butter will do. It’s so satisfying, you don’t need much of it. Moderate amounts can be used for cooking and baked potatoes. Limiting your sweets will reduce your overall fat intake, allowing you to partake in golden goodness.

Listen as butter expert Elaine Khosrova joins Dr. Pamela Peeke to praise the merits of butter.

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