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10 Things to Never Say to Someone Who Can’t Eat Gluten

10 Things to Never Say to Someone Who Can’t Eat Gluten

Written by Lauren Allen
on Thursday, 27 February 2014

You may have read my last rant about the differences between someone who physically can not break down gluten (the protein that is found in wheat, barley and rye) and will get terribly sick if gluten ends up on their plate, to those that think gluten is for some particular reason an ingredient that once not consumed anymore will help them lose weight and eat healthy.

At the three year anniversary of my diagnosis coming up, I wanted to share to those who still don't fully understand why I can't just pick the brownies out of an ice cream sundae.

Let me help you so you won't embarrass yourself and annoy your friend.

What you should never say to someone who can't eat gluten:
Omega-7 Fatty Acids Decrease Hunger

Omega-7 Fatty Acids Decrease Hunger

Written by Michael A. Smith, MD
on Wednesday, 26 February 2014

The Sea Buckthorn plant has an unusual concentration of the essential omega-7 fatty acid. Some nutritionists even believe it's the best source of Omega-7 fat that exists.

But why is this important to you?

Well, for starters, omega-7 helps your body maintain itself in a variety of ways, including counteracting weight gain. The discovery of this fact has obviously produced a great amount of interest among medical researchers, and initial surprising research has many predicting that omega-7 may ultimately become a powerful tool in the weight loss battle.

Below, we'll explore the details.
5 Keys to Living a Long, Healthy, Happy Life

5 Keys to Living a Long, Healthy, Happy Life

Written by Michael Roizen, MD
on Friday, 07 February 2014

Last week the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report that found American's life expectancy has yet again increased for both men and women. Individuals born in 2009 can expect to live longer than ever before - approximately 78.5 years, up from just 78.1 years one year ago.

A gain of more than a third of a year in just one year. At this rate, this might be interpreted to mean the 30 year old person (in 2010) making healthy choices who would have been estimated to live to 95 in 2010, would make it to 115+ by the time she is 90 in 2070.

Since the data were collected and analyzed, life expectancy has increased even higher to 78.7 years, according to the CDC website, in-line with this potential. But will these be healthy vibrant years. Yes, you can make them that.

Thanks to improvements in medical technology for treating heart disease and stroke, Americans are living longer lives than ever before. The downfall of these technologies is that while they are able to buy a few extra years, they are not necessarily providing quality years of health and wellbeing.

Prevention is needed to do that.
What Your Food Looks Like Can Help Your Digestion

What Your Food Looks Like Can Help Your Digestion

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Monday, 03 February 2014


We used to have a saying in school: "HEAL THE HOLE". Because so much of one's overall health depends on taking in nutrients, assimilating, digesting and absorbing them in order to have optimal health. Digestion truly is the key to being well and vital.

Did you ever hear that digestion actually starts in the mouth, not in the stomach?

Well guess what? Neither of those places is where the mighty and imperative digestive process can and should begin.

Digestion actually starts in the eyes and in the nose. Yes, I said the eyes and the nose.

Modern Day Thyroid: Thinking Things Through

Modern Day Thyroid: Thinking Things Through

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Thursday, 30 January 2014

Have you been feeling a little "off" lately? Lack of energy, always feeling cold, trouble concentrating, or unexplained weight gain could be a sign of an underactive thyroid. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, upwards of 27 million Americans suffer from some type of thyroid disorder. Of those, it's estimated that half remain undiagnosed.

Misdiagnosed and Misunderstood

Hailed as "the master" of our endocrine system, second only to the pituitary, the thyroid is a small gland shaped like the outspread wings of a butterfly that sits at the base of the throat. It excretes two hormones - thyroxine (also known as T4) and triiodothyronine (or T3) - that regulate metabolism within every cell in the body.

Low levels of these hormones slow everything down, and it's why symptoms of hypothyroidism often include weight gain and fatigue, as well as constipation, depression, irritability, low body temperature, sleep disturbances, forgetfulness, edema (fluid retention), hair loss, decreased libido, joint pain, and a hoarse voice.

Yet, because these symptoms can resemble a host of other diseases, the thyroid is often overlooked by physicians.
Can Hypothermia Save Lives?

Can Hypothermia Save Lives?

Written by Michael A. Smith, MD
on Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Did you know that ice can potentially save your life?

If you're having a heart attack, it could.

Scientists are discovering how cooling the human body down several degrees can actually save lives. This isn't the stuff of science fiction, but the result of many years of research.

If you find this interesting, read on to find out how hypothermia is making a difference in the medical field. Who knows, it may actually save your life one day.
Health Benefits of Donating Blood

Health Benefits of Donating Blood

Written by Michael A. Smith, MD
on Sunday, 15 December 2013

Donating blood has many health benefits. Not only will you help someone in need of blood, but you will also help optimize your health and wellness. Here are the top three health benefits from donating blood.

Protect Your Heart by Reducing Oxidative Stress

Iron in your blood can oxidize resulting in damage to your cells and tissues. The increase in oxidative stress is most dangerous to your cardiovascular system. According to a new study published by the American Medical Association, giving blood every six months led to fewer heart attacks and strokes in test participants ages 43 to 61.

Excessive iron is thought to contribute to heart disease, especially at its early stages. Donating blood on a regular basis reduces the iron stores in the body and this study supports the theory that reducing iron appears to preserve cardiovascular health.

A second study of 2,682 men in Finland, reported in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that men who donated blood at least once a year had an 88 percent lower risk of heart attacks than non-donors. This same group of researchers published a follow-up study and found that men who donated blood were less likely than non-donors to show any signs of cardiovascular disease.1
My Eating Disorder: Lover, Best Friend, Tormenter

My Eating Disorder: Lover, Best Friend, Tormenter

Written by Sylvia Anderson
on Friday, 13 December 2013
You're back! Glad to know I didn't scare you away with Part 1 of my turmoil and trouble with ED. And if you're joining me for the first time, ED = Eating Disorder, not Erectile Dysfunction... I'll save that topic for the experts (see Part 1 of the blog here).

When I last left you, I was talking about all the ways an eating disorder can envelop you, taking you to the deepest, darkest places of your soul. It's a sickness – and it really IS a sickness, mentally and physically – that seeps into every pore of your being. It becomes the absolute most important thing in your life and does not care who (or what) is sacrificed in the process whether it's friends or family members... or husbands, marriages.

A positive? You get really good at math. In the good old days of my eating disorder, I was constantly calculating calories consumed vs. calories burned in my mind, figuring out just how many hours of exercise I would need to burn off that apple I had for dinner. To be honest, I still do this to some extent; I'm just eating a more "acceptable" amount of food.

An eating disorder never gives you a rest. It consumes every second, every minute of your day, from the moment you wake until you fall asleep. I even dream about it.
Leaky Gut & A Possible Connection to Hot Flashes

Leaky Gut & A Possible Connection to Hot Flashes

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Friday, 13 December 2013
We had a saying in Naturopathic Medical School that stated, "if you want to heal a person, heal the gut." It's fitting that I have written about digestive issues like intestinal permeability or "leaky gut syndrome" and all of its complications various times in the past decade and the time has come again.

Intestinal permeability describes a cascade of symptoms and disorders that stem from small intestine's semi-permeable membrane becoming excessively permeable for a variety of reasons, allowing infiltration of microbial and metabolic toxins (as well as undigested food) into the bloodstream. These symptoms include fatigue, immune deficiency, food allergies, asthma and eczema.

Intestinal permeability may also be a contributor to other modern illnesses such as insulin resistance, obesity, neurotransmitter disorders, autoimmune disorders and cancer. In fact, it may account for 50 percent of chronic illness.

One symptom that I have not linked to intestinal permeability in the past, which has been getting my attention lately, is the vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, an overlooked aspect of inflammation.
My Empty Plate: The Best Meal an Eating Disorder Can Buy

My Empty Plate: The Best Meal an Eating Disorder Can Buy

Written by Sylvia Anderson
on Monday, 09 December 2013

I was going to wait until "Eating Disorder Awareness Month" came around to write this blog, but the truth is we should be "aware" of eating disorders every single day.

If you've never been affected by an eating disorder, or you have never known anyone with an eating disorder, you may be thinking, "So what? What do I care? There's a whole month devoted to people who want to be skinny???" For those of us who DO suffer, most of us would probably answer: we honestly hope you don't care.

Contrary to some beliefs, eating disorders – and the physical symptoms that often follow – are NOT always a way to garner attention. In fact, many people suffering from an eating disorder would rather you just leave them and their eating habits (or in some cases, non-eating habits) alone.

My family and some of my friends (the ones I trust) have come to accept this about me. They know I will not be partaking in family or holiday dinners. I will gladly invite people out to eat, but I will not eat with them. My mom has learned to simply not set a plate for me. I'm not offended; I actually love this about her. My husband knows I will never join him in ordering at dinner. He "eats for two," as I often explain it. And I love him for it as well. The servers at our favorite restaurant know that I may take something to-go, but I will never eat in the confines of the establishment.

Weird? Yes. But bear with me a bit.
About Those Statins

About Those Statins

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Thursday, 05 December 2013
I have a radio show that airs every Wednesday at noon Pacific Time on RadioMD.com called "Mindful Medicine". It is simply another format for me to hopefully "knock 'em alive" with empowering information that can help people be their own PCPs "primary care providers" and have their homes be their own HMOs "Health Maintenance Organization" Get it?

I am fortunate to have a fascinating and amazing regular contributor, Dr. Jacob Tietlbaum MD, join me every week to talk about easy, effective, natural ways to help people take back control and manage their health. Jacob and I were talking very passionately about the newest recommendations, handed down from a government agency, which suggested (based on a faulty calculation) that many more people would be candidates for taking statin medications.

We both were fairly incensed about this notion, knowing that statin medications come with serious risks and side effects and research has shown that there are many common lifestyle choices that are far more likely to be associated with a lower risk of heart attack and heart attack death than taking statins medications. Some of these include eating chocolate, participating in regular exercise, getting adequate nutrition and having cats. YES, having cats.
Effective Non-Hormonal Therapies for Menopausal Symptoms

Effective Non-Hormonal Therapies for Menopausal Symptoms

Written by Holly Lucille, ND, RN
on Wednesday, 27 November 2013
While the fluctuation and decline of reproductive hormones is a normal and expected event in mid-life women, the associated symptoms are nonetheless disruptive. Until very recently, millions of women alleviated their hot flashes and night sweats with conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate (synthetic hormone replacement therapy or HRT).

However, mounting evidence from several clinical trials has shown that women using synthetic HRT are at significant increased risk of developing breast cancer, coronary heart disease, pulmonary embolism, and stroke.

With little room for HRT in current practice and little else in the traditional medicine chest to consider, physicians are increasingly turning to natural non-hormonal therapies for women who need relief from menopausal symptoms.

As a naturopathic physician, I have used botanical medicines and other natural alternatives for many years with great success to help women create and maintain hormonal health. I've found the most effective approach combines stress management, diet, exercise and nutritional supplements to support and work with a woman's body, not against it. While each patient's treatment plan is unique, it has been my experience that most symptoms caused by menopause and/or hormone fluctuations and imbalances will respond to natural therapies.
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