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Hospital-Related VTE: Know Your Risk for Blood Clots

From the Show: Health Radio
Summary: What does VTE (blood clots in the legs and lungs) risk assessment involve, and who should be assessed?
Air Date: 10/23/15
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Nigel Key, MD
Nigel Key Dr. Nigel Key is the Harold R. Roberts Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Pathology, Chief of the Section of Classical Hematology, and the Director of the UNC Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center. He is also co-Director of the Thrombosis and Hemostasis research program in the McAllister Heart Institute.

Dr. Key received his medical degree from the University of St. Andrews and the University of Manchester Medical School. He received postgraduate training in internal medicine and hematology in the United Kingdom. Following 15 years on the Hematology/Oncology faculty at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Key was recruited to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2005.

Dr. Key's clinical interests include the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders including hemophilia and von Willebrand disease, as well as arterial and venous thromboembolic disorders. He has authored well over 100 peer-reviewed articles, approximately 20 book chapters, and is co-editor of a popular textbook on disorders of bleeding and clotting.
Hospital-Related VTE: Know Your Risk for Blood Clots
According to the World Health Organization, VTE (blood clots in the legs and lungs) is the leading cause of preventable death in hospitals worldwide.

In fact, up to 60 percent of VTE clots strike patients when they are in the hospital or soon after discharge.

Hospitalization, whether admitted for surgery, illness or other medical reasons, is a leading risk factor for VTE.

Patients should understand what a blood clot can look or feel like so they can be their best advocate:
  •  In the legs: pain/tenderness often starting in the calf; swelling including the ankle or foot; redness, noticeable changes in color and/or warmth in the leg.
  •  In the lungs: unexplained shortness of breath or rapid breathing; chest pain (sometimes worse upon a deep breath); rapid heart rate; and/or light headedness or passing out.

Listen in as Nigel Key, MD, shares the important information you need to know about staying in the hospital and your VTE risk.