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American Academy of Pediatrics Advises Cautious Use of Antibiotics

From the Show: Healthy Children
Summary: As many as 10 million antibiotic prescriptions are written each year for infections they are unlikely to help.
Air Date: 11/20/13
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Mary Anne Jackson, MD
Mary Anne Jackson picDr. Mary Anne Jackson obtained her medical degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine. She completed her residency at Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati where she was recognized with the Samuel Dalinsky Memorial Award as the outstanding graduating resident. She then completed her infectious diseases fellowship training at the University of Texas-Southwestern completing an additional year of research in the laboratory of Eric Hansen, PhD. Board certified in Pediatrics and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, she has been a member of the faculty at Children's Mercy Hospital & Clinics since 1984 where she is Section Chief in Infectious Diseases and the Associate Chair for Community and Regional Physician Collaboration. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the Infectious Disease Society of America and a member of the American Pediatric Society. She has served on the editorial boards of Healthy Kids, Concise Reviews in Pediatric Infectious Diseases and is a current member of the editorial board of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Journal. She currently is the medical editor for the infectious diseases sub-board for the American Board of Pediatrics and a member of the AAP Committee on Infectious Diseases (Red Book Committee). She has authored over 100 peer reviewed publications and book chapters. Dr. Jackson's research focuses on strategies to reduce the incidence of hospital acquired infection, treatment of antibiotic resistant infection and vaccine implementation and education.
American Academy of Pediatrics Advises Cautious Use of Antibiotics
A clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, offers updated guidance on treating respiratory tract infections in children, with the goal of reducing unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions.

The clinical report, "Principles of Judicious Antibiotic Prescribing for Bacterial Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Pediatrics," published in the December 2013 Pediatrics and released online Nov. 18, advises physicians to use stringent diagnostic criteria to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections.

The report focuses on three of the most common pediatric upper respiratory infections: ear infections, sinus infections and strep throat.

"This report is particularly timely as we enter the winter season, when many respiratory viruses commonly circulate," said Mary Anne Jackson, MD, FAAP, a member of the AAP Committee on Infectious Diseases and a lead author of the report.

"By using these principles, physicians will be able to more appropriately diagnose and treat otitis media [middle ear infection], sinusitis and strep pharyngitis."

Studies have shown that as many as 10 million antibiotic prescriptions are written each year for infections they are unlikely to help.

Recent evidence shows that prescriptions for broad-spectrum antibiotics have increased, even when no antibiotics are needed or when a narrow-spectrum antibiotic would work.

Overuse of antibiotics contributes to antibiotic resistance, making infections more difficult to treat.

Join Dr. Jackson as she shares more information on the new guidelines, as well as the danger of over-prescribing antibiotics.
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