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Celiac Disease & Children: Hope on the Horizon

From the show: Healthy Children
Ivor D. Hill, MD
Guest Bio
Guest Bio: Ivor D. Hill, MD
ivor hillDr. Hill received his medical training at the University of Cape Town Medical School and completed his training in pediatrics and pediatric gastroenterology at the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. He was a Senior Specialist and Senior Lecturer at the University of Cape Town Medical School until 1990 when he immigrated to the USA. He was appointed Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Hahnemann University School of Medicine in Philadelphia and then Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore before moving to Wake Forest University School of Medicine in 1995. In 2013 he joined the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, as section chief of pediatric gastroenterology. He is the author of 35 book chapters in Textbooks of Pediatrics and Gastroenterology and has over 80 publications in peer reviewed medical journals.

He was the Chair of the committee for development of the "Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Children" published in JPGN in 2005.

He was Chair of the NASPGHAN Ethics Committee and Chair of the Professional Education Committee. He was an Executive Board member of the CDHNF and serves on the CDHNF Scientific Advisory Board for the Pediatric GERD Education Campaign and the CDHNF Scientific Advisory Board for the Celiac Disease Education Campaign. In the American Academy of Pediatrics he is a member of the Executive Committee of the National Conference and Exhibition Planning Group and is the Chair of the Committee on Continuing Medical Education. He also serves on the American Board of Pediatrics Sub-Board for Pediatric Gastroenterology and is the chair elect of this Sub-Board.
Celiac disease is a chronic condition that occurs in about 1 in 100 people and results in damage to the lining of the small intestines.

It affects those individuals who have the genetic potential for the condition. The disease is triggered by the ingestion of products that contain wheat, barley or rye, collectively known as gluten.

A number of genes have been identified that are related to celiac disease, and it seems there is no one specific gene that causes the disease to become active; rather a combination of genes is involved.

The major trigger factor that leads to escalation of the disease is the ingestion of foods that contain wheat, barley or rye proteins.

Pediatric gastroenterologist, Ivor Hill, MD, is one of the leading clinicians and researchers in childhood celiac disease. He joins Melanie Cole, MS, to discuss celiac disease in children and what you can do to help your celiac child lead a normal and healthy life.

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