healthy-children-header

Children's Cancer Risk: Don't Ignore These Symptoms

From the Show: Healthy Children
Summary: Fever, chills, appetite loss, aching bones or joints are just some of the symptoms that could be signs of cancer in your child.
Air Date: 10/22/14
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Kathleen A. Neville, MD
KathleenNeville 1Kathleen Neville, M.D., M.S. is board certified in pediatrics, pediatric hematology/oncology and clinical pharmacology and received her Master of Science degree in Clinical Research from Indiana University. She has significant clinical trials expertise (e.g., study design, execution, data analysis) and translational research experience (e.g., PG/PK/PD and development of non-invasive PD surrogate endpoints).  Dr. Neville has also been appointed to serve on the pediatric subcommittee of the FDA’s Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee and the FDA's Committee on Clinical Pharmacology. She also currently serves as Chair for the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Drugs. Dr. Neville also currently serves as Chair for the NICHD funded Pediatric Trials multicenter trial to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of a liquid formulation of hydroxyurea. Dr. Neville’s research interests relate to the early phase (Phase I/II) study of medications in children, characterizing the determinants of variability in drug disposition and response, and development of pediatric appropriate formulations.
Children's Cancer Risk: Don't Ignore These Symptoms
Cancer strikes more than 9,000 children a year, making it important to pay attention to your child's possible symptoms.

Cancers in children and adolescents belong mainly to four groups: leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas and gliomas.

Fever, chills, appetite loss, aching bones or joints are just some of the symptoms that could be signs of cancer in your child.

The following mnemonic was developed by the American Cancer Society to help clinicians remember the early warning signs of childhood cancer.

Continued, unexplained weight loss
Headaches with vomiting in the morning
Increased swelling or persistent pain in bones or joints, sometimes accompanied by limping
Lump or mass in abdomen, neck, or elsewhere
Development of a whitish appearance in the pupil of the eye or sudden changes in vision
Recurrent fevers not caused by infections
Excessive bruising or bleeding (often sudden)
Noticeable paleness or prolonged tiredness

Listen in as Dr. Kathleen Neville discusses how to recognize symptoms in your child that could indicate the presence of cancer.
Transcription:


aap bumper
HClogoCMYK-300
FREE RadioMD Newsletter: