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Prevention of Cheerleading Injuries

From the Show: Healthy Children
Summary: For high school girls and college women, cheerleading is by far the most dangerous sport.  Learn what precautions to take before an injury happens and how to treat one if it does.
Air Date: 10/24/12
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Dr. Jeffrey Mjaanes, MD
Dr Jeff MjaanesDr Jeffrey Mjaanes is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of
Pediatrics and Orthopaedic Surgery at Rush University Medical Center in
Chicago, IL. He serves as Team Physician for DePaul University as well as
several local high schools. He is also a team physician for the United
States Soccer Federation. Dr. Mjaanes serves as the Medical Director of the
Chicago Sports Concussion Clinic at Rush. Dr Mjaanes is a Fellow of the
American Academy of Pediatrics and is Co-Chair of the Sports Medicine and
Fitness Committee for the lllinois chapter of the AAP.
     Prevention of Cheerleading Injuries
    For high school girls and college women, cheerleading is by far the most dangerous sport for girls. Cheer accounts for 65 percent of all catastrophic injuries in girls’ high school athletics, shows a recent report by the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research at the University of North Carolina.  Learn what precautions to take before an injury happens and how to treat one if it does.  Over the past few decades, cheerleading has evolved from leading the crowd in cheers at football games to a competitive, year-round sport featuring complex acrobatic stunts performed by a growing number of athletes  – and as a result the number and severity of injuries from cheerleading has also surged.
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