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Dangerous Teen Behaviors: Internet Challenges

From the Show: Healthy Children
Summary: How can you keep your kids safe from dangerous challenges they find online?
Air Date: 1/30/18
Duration: 19:49
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: David Hill, MD
david hillDr. David Hill is Vice President of Cape Fear Pediatrics in Wilmington, NC, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UNC Medical School.

He serves on the executive committees of the North Carolina Pediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics Council On Communications and the Media.

In addition to writing a monthly column for Wilmington Parent Magazine, Dr. Hill writes and records for multiple websites including as Livestrong.com, eHow.com, and thedoctorsvideos.com. He has three children, ages six, nine, and 11.
Dangerous Teen Behaviors: Internet Challenges
Just when it seems like these challenges are out of the news, something else pops up.

Social media rewards outrageous behavior. No one is getting “likes” for cleaning up their bedroom.

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Teens are impulsive. Their brains haven’t developed enough to fully grasp the consequences of dangerous behaviors.

The current detergent pod challenge presents many dangers. The detergent can burn and perforate the esophagus. If the pod is punctured, the powders inside can be inhaled and permanently damage the airways. The chemicals can destroy the internal organs.

How do you talk to kids about these dangerous challenges?

If it says "challenge," it’s probably a horrible idea. There are exceptions, like the ALS ice bucket challenge. But, as a general rule, they should avoid things labeled as challenges.

Friend and follow your kids to curb any risky behavior. Let them teach you how to use social media.

Encourage your kids to try to freak you out with the most shocking thing they’ve encountered. You’ve seen some things in your day. The trick is not to freak out when they tell you the crazy thing that happened. Help them build the skill of judging risk by talking about what they witnessed and what could happen next in a similar situation. They have to learn how to think through these things for themselves.

Listen as Dr. David Hill joins Melanie Cole, MS, to discuss how to help your kids develop judgment to keep them away from dangerous behaviors.

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