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Women & Alcohol Abuse: The Hidden Epidemic

From the Show: HER
Summary: Nearly one million American women are binge drinkers; and they aren’t just sorority girls.
Air Date: 12/19/13
Duration: 10
Host: Michelle King Robson and Dr. Pamela Peeke, MD
Guest Bio: David Sack, MD
David SackDr. Sack is board certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry, and Addiction Medicine, with extensive operational experience. He previously served as president of College Health IPA, now the largest behavioral health group in California. In addition, he served as senior vice president for Community Programs Aspen Education Group, a start-up he grew to more than $20 million. Prior to that, Dr. Sack was a senior vice president for clinical research at Comprehensive Neuroscience, Inc., a CNS-focused SMO, where he grew his division from $5 million to $30 million.

Elements Behavioral Health is a leading national provider of addiction and mental health programs that includes Promises Treatment Centers in California and other facilities located in Florida, Texas and Tennessee. The company offers comprehensive, innovative treatment for substance abuse, sexual addiction, trauma, eating disorders and other mental health disorders. Elements is committed to delivering clinically sophisticated treatment that promotes permanent lifestyle change, not only for the patient but for the entire family system. The company is backed by Frazier Healthcare and NEA.
Women & Alcohol Abuse: The Hidden Epidemic

They are all around you.

The young business professional, yoga instructor and soccer mom all have one thing in common: a drinking problem.

So, who really meets the medical definition of an alcoholic?

David Sack, MD, board certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, reports that nearly one million American women are binge drinkers; and they aren’t just sorority girls.

The more educated and well off women are, the more likely they are to imbibe, found a Gallup poll from 2010. Another study published in 2010 found that white women were more likely to drink than women of other racial backgrounds, though the rates for Latina and black women were rising.

Many women rationalize their over-consumption, since red wine, in moderation, has been discovered to have some heart health benefits.

According to the Mayo Clinic, antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that's gotten attention, because it can help prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces "bad" cholesterol and prevents blood clots.

Dr. Sack, MD, discusses women and binge drinking and the science behind alcohol consumption.

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