her-header

Is Social Media Your Therapist?

From the Show: HER
Summary: People use social media as a coping mechanism and an online therapy session. Is this is a healthy form of communication, or just too much over-sharing?
Air Date: 1/9/14
Duration: 10
Host: Michelle King Robson and Dr. Pamela Peeke, MD
Guest Bio: Pamela Rutledge, PhD
Pam RutledgeA pioneer in media psychology, Dr. Pamela Rutledge works at the intersection of design, technology and psychology. She consults and writes on the human side of our socially-networked world to promote media technology's positive potential. By uniting the ancient art of story with cutting-edge science, she helps clients develop a road map to achieve their goals, from personal branding and leadership to corporate messaging. Dr. Rutledge is Director of the Media Psychology Research Center and adjunct faculty at Fielding Graduate University and the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology.

Dr. Rutledge has published both academic and popular work and also blogs for PsychologyToday.com. She is a frequent expert source on social media, technology and popular culture for media outlets such as Associated Press, NY Times, the UK Guardian, BBC4, HuffPost Live, PC World, Seventeen Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, Good Morning America, ABCnews.com, Toronto Sun, Education Week, and USAToday. Dr. Rutledge is based in Newport Beach, California.
Is Social Media Your Therapist?
Social media has fast become a new type of therapy.

People turn to social media to share their lives from what they ate for breakfast, what mood they are in, if they are going through a breakup or mourning over a death.

Even gang-related incidences and bullying have been bragged about on social media.

Yes, in a healthy way social media has become a platform for self expression and a way to connect with others. But when does it go too far? People are now usin social media as a coping mechanism and an online therapy session, for free.

Why are people disclosing all of their personal information?

Are you?

Does it make you feel better if you feel as though you are being "heard"?

A pioneer in media psychology, Dr. Pamela Rutledge, works at the intersection of design, technology and psychology. In this segment of HER Radio, Dr. Rutledge discusses if this is a healthy form of therapy, or just too much over-sharing.
FREE RadioMD Newsletter: