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How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids and Become a Calmer, Happier Parent

From the Show: Naturally Savvy
Summary: You're not a bad parent if you sometimes yell. It happens. The key is not getting carried away or falling into a pattern of shouting at your kids.
Air Date: 11/26/19
Duration: 26:40
Host: Andrea Donsky, RHN & Lisa Davis, MPH
Guest Bio: Carla Naumburg, PhD
Author Carla Naumburg, PhD, clinical social worker, parent coach, and mother of two was having a particularly grueling evening with her daughters when she found herself Googling “how to stop yelling at my kids.” That night started Naumburg on a journey to developing a system for more peaceful parenting, which she shares in How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids: A Guide to Becoming a Calmer, Happier Parent (On-Sale: August 20, 2019; Paperback)—a new parenting book that combines insights from brain science and clinical research with intimate personal experience. While offering an effective, evidence-based approach to help today's overwhelmed and overworked parents be more present and patient with their children.
  • Book Title: How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids: A Guide to Becoming a Calmer, Happier Parent
How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids and Become a Calmer, Happier Parent
When your kid is having a meltdown in the middle of the grocery store, or has disobeyed you for the fifth time that day, it can take everything in your will to keep yourself from having your own meltdown.

You're not a bad parent if you sometimes yell. It happens. The key is not getting carried away or falling into a pattern of shouting at your kids.

Carla Naumburg, PhD, author of How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids: A Guide to Becoming a Calmer, Happier Parent, found her own way to calm after realizing there had to be a better way.

In his episode, she joins host Lisa Davis to discuss the book, as well as offer these tips:

  • Know your triggers by understanding what sets you off.
  • Make buttons as push-proof as possible by getting enough sleep, single-tasking, accepting support, and not beating yourself up.
  • Do literally anything else when on the brink of explosion. It could be the classic three deep breaths, but it could also be playing a little air guitar -- anything that redirects.
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