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Concussion in Sports: How Common Is It?

From the Show: Train Your Body
Summary: Symptoms are unique for each athlete, and many are difficult to detect, as athletes may underreport their injuries.
Air Date: 1/8/13
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Douglas McKeag, MD
mckeag douglas small resizedDr. McKeag was appointed Chairman of the Department of Family Medicine in October of 1999. He is OneAmerica Professor Emeritus of Family Medicine and Director, IU Center for Sports Medicine. Dr. McKeag is a past president and founder of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and is active with the American College of Sports Medicine. He helped develop the criteria for the Certificate of Added Qualification in Sports Medicine through the American Board of Family Medicine.

He has served as a professional consultant to the 2008 Beijing Olympic Committee, Kuwait University, Puerto Rico Olympic Committee, Clemson University, New York Giants and the Indianapolis Colts.


Concussion in Sports: How Common Is It?
Estimates on Concussion suggest that 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur in sports and recreation-related activities every year.

Concussions, even in mild forms, are recognized as a type of traumatic brain injury that requires medical attention and monitoring.

Concussions can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that can change the way your brain normally works.

Symptoms are unique for each athlete, and many are difficult to detect, as athletes may underreport their injuries.

But by learning the facts about concussion, and taking proper steps to treatment, we can help all athletes enjoy healthy careers. A pedometer senses your body motion and counts your footsteps. This count is converted into distance by knowing the length of your usual stride. Wearing a pedometer and recording your daily steps and distance is a great motivating tool
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