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How Your Parents Affect Your Relationships

From the Show: Staying Well
Summary: Observing how your parents interact could lead to an understanding of your own relationships
Air Date: 9/23/13
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Joseph Shrand, MD
Joe ShrandJoseph Shrand, M.D., is an instructor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, an assistant child psychiatrist on the medical staff of Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Medical Director of CASTLE (Clean and Sober Teens Living Empowered), a new intervention unit for at-risk teens that is part of High Point Treatment Center in Brockton, Mass.

With more than 20 years as a practicing psychiatrist, Dr. Shrand has vast experience in the field of adolescent anger management and conflict resolution which has made him a sought-after speaker. He is also affectionately known as Dr. Joe, as he was Joe in the original PBS TV Children's TV show, ZOOM, which won two Emmy Awards in the early 1970's. Dr. Shrand is the only ZOOM kid to have published any books
How Your Parents Affect Your Relationships
When you're a little kid, the best learning tool is through observation within your environment. You pick up what love is, what it means to be a mother, father, spouse, what it means to trust, and how to express emotion.

When you see your parents interact, you assume that is how to treat your significant other. But what happens if the parents relationship puts the child in a hostile environment, or if the child has to go through a divorce?

As we know, divorce can get ugly. Co-parenting amicably after a divorce or separation is rarely easy, but it give your children the emotional stability needed.

How much has your parents' relationship affected the way you handle your relationships later in life?

Females who come from divorced parents are 60 percent more likely to get a divorce than females who are part of non-divorced families. Males who have divorced parents are 35 percent more likely to get divorced.

Dr. Joseph Shrand is an instructor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and an assistant child psychiatrist on the medical staff of Massachusetts General Hospital explains how your parents communication and habits influence your own relationships.