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Are the Foods in Your Lunchbox Making You Sick?

From the Show: Eat Right Radio
Summary: Avoid these common food safety mistakes when packing your kid's (or your) lunchbox.
Air Date: 9/15/15
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Sarah Krieger, MPH, RDN
Krieger Sarah 1942smallSarah Krieger is a nutrition consultant and leader of All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine’s weight management and fitness for families programs Fit4AllKids, Fit4AllTeens and Fit4AllMoms. These programs target children, teens, pregnant women and their families and are led in high schools, fitness centers and pregnancy centers. Krieger consults for Healthy Start, working with women from pre-conception and pregnancy and children from birth to age three. Krieger also has extensive experience in the foodservice industry and is the owner of a nutrition consulting and video business. Her syndicated nutrition education web program SarahRD.tv was launched in August 2011 and she published an e-book, Coffee Grounds, Banana Peels and Diapers: How to entertain friends and family in the 21st century without allowing life to get in the way (2014). Krieger is the 2015-2016 president of the Florida Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Krieger is a graduate of Central Michigan University and earned a master’s degree in public health from the University of South Florida.
Are the Foods in Your Lunchbox Making You Sick?
On hectic mornings, it's important to still take the time to pack a nutritious and safe lunch for you and your children.

Healthy lunches are essential, but safety is also a concern. What are some tips to make sure safety comes first?

Start each day fresh by washing lunchboxes and lunch bags with warm, soapy water after each use.

Perishable foods should not be left out of refrigeration for more than two hours. Remember, many students don't have access to a refrigerator at school.

Help keep your child's lunch safe by packing it in an insulated lunch bag or lunchbox and including an ice pack or frozen beverage container.

When building lunches, choose whole-grain breads, low-fat or fat-free dairy options, and lean meats and proteins.

Sarah Krieger, MPH, RDN, is here to share her top food safety tips, refrigerator safety, the importance of a food thermometer and some new healthy meal ideas.