health-radio-header

Health Topics A-Z

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Y

Z

Women's Sexual Dysfunction

From the Show: Health Radio
Summary: Learn about women's sexual dysfunction and how to work through it.
Air Date: 5/11/16
Duration: 10
Host: Melanie Cole, MS
Guest Bio: Becky K. Lynn, MD, FACOG
Dr. Becky LynnDr. Becky Lynn provides general obstetrics and gynecological care, specializing in sexual health, hypoactive sexual desire disorder (low sex drive), and dyspareunia (painful intercourse). She treats conditions that include orgasmic disorder, menopause, irregular bleeding, vulvar disease, and sexually transmitted diseases. Dr. Lynn offers family planning, colposcopy, and endometrial and cervical biopsies.

She is interested in research that examines sexual dysfunction.

Dr. Lynn is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women’s Health, Division of General Obstetrics and Gynecology, at Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

She is a member of the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health, American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists, and World Professional Association for Transgender Medicine. She is a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Dr. Lynn once rode her bike from Paris to London to raise money for breast cancer research.

Women's Sexual Dysfunction
Occasional problems with sexual intercourse are common for both sexes.

Women may not enjoy sexual intercourse from lack of sexual desire, inability to become aroused, lack of sexual release, or pain during intercourse. If a problem persists, it's important to see a doctor to sort out the cause and resolve the issue.

Women commonly complain of painful intercourse. This can come from vaginal dryness, a frequent side effect of menopause. Another complaint is involuntary vaginal spasms causing pain.

Intercourse may be painful because of ovarian cysts or endometriosis. This pain is more abdominal than vaginal.

It's important for your doctor to get a good sexual, health and family history, as well as a thorough exam. Your doctor should steer you toward treatments that have been tested and have plenty of research to support their usefulness.

Topical estrogen works well for vaginal atrophy. This helps with elasticity and lubrication. Topical products are absorbed into the bloodstream in small amounts. It doesn't carry the same risks as pills and patches.

A pill or a balm won't help with low libido. You must have a good sexual self-esteem to be willing to share yourself with another. Discussing sexual relationships can help sort out some libido issues.

Listen in as Dr. Becky Lynn shares about female sexual dysfunction and how to work through it.
FREE RadioMD Newsletter:
{JFBCFan height=395 width=350 colorscheme=light href=http://www.facebook.com/YourRadioMD show_faces=1 stream=0 header=1 border_color=#C8C8C8 force_wall=0 key=rmd123}