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EP 1057B - Aortic Condition More Deadly in Women than Men

Summary: Women who experience acute aortic dissection—a spontaneous and catastrophic tear in one of the body’s main arteries—not only are older and have more advanced disease than men when they seek medical care, but they also are more likely to die
Air Date: 8/17/21
Duration: 24:13
Host: Michael Roizen, MD
Guest Bio: Dr. Benjamin A. Youdelman
Dr. Benjamin Youdelman is a cardiac surgeon who specializes in Aortic surgery.  He is the Co-Director of The Maimonides Aortic Center in Brooklyn New York with the Chief of Vascular Surgery (Dr. Robert Rhee). They practice a coordinated approach to the entire aorta, the patient, and their family.  The goal is increased awareness of Aortic Aneurysm, Aortic Dissection, Aortic Rupture, and the importance of getting yourself checked for Aortic Disease especially when it runs in the family. Dr. Youdelman has a special interest is in the risk stratification of patients and families with aortic disease which led him to join THINK AORTA, an International campaign to raise awareness about aortic disease.  This work involves patient and family support group meetings, national promotion of aortic disease educational campaigns for health care providers, and a coordinated International approach to expanding this message around the world. Dr. Youdelman is a graduate of Saint Louis University Medical School.  He completed his training at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Aortic Surgery after general surgery at New York Medical College and cardiac surgery at Drexel University.
EP 1057B - Aortic Condition More Deadly in Women than Men

Women who experience acute aortic dissection—a spontaneous and catastrophic tear in one of the body’s main arteries—not only are older and have more advanced disease than men when they seek medical care, but they also are more likely to die, according to research published online recently in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Benjamin A. Youdelman, MD, from Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York, who was not directly involved in this research, explained that these variances in clinical presentation indicate that women may be waiting longer to seek medical care compared to men. This may be due to female patients being “stoic,” not considering their symptoms as signs of a significant problem, and not prioritizing their care.

Overall, female patients had increased mortality, although, in the last few years, mortality between the sexes was comparable, which suggests recent improvements in care. According to Dr. Gleason, better recognition, earlier diagnosis, faster and more efficient care delivery, new and improved surgical techniques—including brain perfusion and reconstruction procedures—and subsequent longitudinal surveillance have all contributed to more lives being saved.

Dr. Youdelman joins us today to discuss these findings, and how family medical history is a critically important factor for identifying patients at risk and saving lives.


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